Bag A Monster Buck

Deer hunters who still need to fill a “TAG” check out VERSUS Country Bag A Monster Buck Game.

Ok so it’s just a game, but I have to say trying to get onto the TOP TEN BOARD is TOUGH!

Check it out!

Monster Buck Game

or click on the Versus web

Good luck!

Rut Predictions for 2010

DEER RUT PREDICTIONS on various web site all have claims and reasons why it will happen.

After hunting all week I can say I haven’t seen a lot of rutting deer;

Deer & Deer Hunting TV always come close to predicting the rut.

The rutting moon this year falls on November 21, the latest it has ever fallen in Alsheimers’ study and given that, it looks like the rut could be later than we’ve seen in a long time. That being said, here is the “cliff notes” version of Alsheimers predictions for the 2010 rut in the North…

· A minor “sweet spot” of deer activity will occur around Oct 22, as the seeking and chasing phases of the rut will begin, but at a slower pace than usual.

· Buck activity will really get kicked into gear around the 15th and increase steadily.

· The major “sweet spot” and the peak of the chasing phase will occur from Nov 21 through 25.

· Most breeding will be done in the last week of Nov and into early December.

For additional information on the rut:

or copy and past this URL:

http://wiredtohunt.com/2010/09/08/a-late-rut-in-2010-d-dh-rut-predictions/

Illegal Deer Hunter Fined $5000

A Lindsay man has been fined a total of $5,000 for illegal hunting-related offences.

Martin Ham pleaded guilty and was fined $1,000 each for unlawfully using an illegal firearm during the deer season and providing false information to a conservation officer. He was also fined a further $3,000 for allowing flesh suitable for food to spoil. He has been suspended from hunting in the province of Ontario for two years.

Court heard that on December 6, 2009, Ham unlawfully shot and killed a trophy buck with a 20-gauge shotgun during the open, muzzle-loader season for deer. He then entered the buck into a Big Buck contest and won.

Following up on a complaint made to the MNR Tips line, a conservation officer interviewed Ham about the acquisition of the buck. After numerous false statements, Ham admitted that the deer had been shot illegally. Though he removed the head of the deer and had it professionally mounted, the carcass was unlawfully permitted to spoil.

Justice of the Peace John Oates heard the case in the Ontario Court of Justice, City of Kawartha Lakes, on June 25, 2010.

For further information on hunting regulations, please consult the 2010-2011 Hunting Regulations Summary, available at ServiceOntario/Government Information Centres, from licence issuers and at ontario.ca/hunting.

To report a natural resources violation, call 1-877-TIPS-MNR (847-7667) toll-free any time or contact your local ministry officer during regular business hours.

You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

Deer License Deadline Approaching

The Deer Hot Line is an easy way to purchase your 2010 deer license.

A quick phone call to 1-800-288-1155 is all that is required to obtain your 2010 deer license.

All that is required is your valid Outdoor Card and a credit card.

You can of course purchase your outdoor card over the phone also.

It took me about three minutes to do it.

Of course the MNR has

RAISED THE PRICE OF YOUR DEER LICENSE TO

$39.75

Don’t wait too long to get yours, who know the price could go up again!

Good luck this year deer hunting

The DEER HOT LINE is 1-800-288-1155

Deer-jumping-fence

Mineral Fountain Works Great

Mineral Fountain keeps deer on your property.

It also provides vital minerals and supplement necessary for a healthy deer herd when they need it most.

Listen closely and you can hear the doe licking the tree!

For more great video from wild cam check it out

www.wildcam.ca

Muskoka Whitetail Deer Management Rack Stacker Seminar

Whitetail deer food plot seminar March 27th at Muskoka’ Holiday Inn with Rack Stacker founder Steve Elmy and Pro Staff Peter Wood.

Muskoka  Home Hardware is hosting an  informative DIY food plot  seminar. Rack Stacker founder Steve Elmy will be talking about everything from basics to advanced techniques in preparing ,planting, and preserving a successful  wildlife food plot.

The Holiday Inn  has a limited amount of seats available so sign up early;

whitetails@rackstacker.ca

Seminar starts at 10 am till 2pm

Admission is free with your donation of canned goods for the local food share program.

Additional information can be found on the Rack Stacker event page

Steve Elmy in hs Rack Stacker Whitetail Deer food plot

Hope to see you there!

Whitetail Deer antler shed hunting has started

When do whitetail deer loose or shed their antlers is asked about this time every year by antler shed hunters.

The simple answer; shed antlers are on the ground already in most locations where snow is common.

Whitetail deer normally start to drop their racks in December and January depending conditions. Of course exceptions happen and I have heard of bucks carrying racks until late February.

Finding a set of antlers take a fair bit of leg-work and luck. I had two bucks that stopped by my Moultri Pro Feeder often and the six-point left me a rack in late December. The Eight-pointer dropped his antlers elsewhere. On a sunny calm day I wander the forest edges and trails that lead to my deer & wild turkey food plots.

How to find deer antler sheds can be as simple as going for a walk along a fence line or ditch. Grab the kids or spouse and talk a walk through a woodlot or food plot. Check the game trails that lead out to a pasture. Keep your eyes searching along the ground for that protruding tip of an antler poking out of a snowdrift as it may be all that you see.

Snow depth plays a large part of a successful day shed hunting so pick your days accordingly. It’s a great way to continue the “hunt” after the deer hunting season has ended.

Wandering those secret locations you may even find that perfect spot to start a whitetail deer or turkey spring food plot. Keeping the deer or wild turkeys close to your location is key for your next hunting season.

March is a great time to put up a pail of Rack Stacker Mineral Fountain. Using a pail of Mineral Blaze or Glory will provide protein supplements for deer and also help grow those massive antlers on the trophy bucks.

Of course if done with a quality seed mixture like a blend of Rack Stacker Sweet Success and Upland Turkey Blend your spring food plot will keep deer and turkeys close by as it matures and grows during the summer months and explodes up to seven feet high by the fall. This provides the cover deer and wild turkey are attracted to.

Food plots work different than game feeders and baiting. They work year round exceptionally well once planted correctly. You don’t have to keep filling up a feeder tube or lug a bushel of apples out to your hunting site. Baiting for wild turkeys during the hunting season is illegal in Ontario. A Rack Stacker Food Plot will attract whitetail deer,wild turkeys, upland birds and most other wild game.

A bonus to this type of food plot is animals will stay close all winter. Keeping the flock of birds or herd of deer on your hunting property and not your neighbours will help ensure an awesome hunting season.

So get out and start your hunt for antler sheds and keep a keen eye out for that secret location or hidden hot spot for a Rack Stacker Food Plot. It’s a win win plan. Finding antlers sheds and keeping whitetail deer and wild turkeys on your food plots is a great way to “hunt” all year.
6-pointer in January

Antlers shed

Deer photos getting easier to take with high end trail camera like the SpyPoint Pro-X

Ontario Whitetail bow hunters need to get closer than firearm hunters for obvious reasons.

One way to get closer to deer when bow hunting in Ontario is to know where they travel during peak times of the day. Often first and last light are considered the best time of course. As deer are slaves to their  stomachs they can easily be monitored. During  the “RUT”  deer traveling anytime.

With the popularity of trail cameras knowing where & when deer move has made this a whole lot easier. Simply by placing a few trail cameras at funnels or forest/field edges has often paid off big during the hunting season. Food plots always draw deer in night and day but with a trail camera that displays time and date you know a deer habits of munching on afternoon snacks before prime time.

Where the Does go so go the Bucks is often mentioned. Believe it. You can verify this easily with a trail camera positioned on your food plot. You can place trail cameras at trail intersections about 100 yards from a food plot. Often the Big Boys hang up there while waiting for night to darken the forest. Again if you know where and when  a tree stand or ground blind may make all the difference in filling a tag.

I use a Spy-Point Pro-X series of trail camera for the  quality of photos and video it can produce. Size does matter where game cameras are concerned and the Pro-X is compact and easily hidden. A rechargeable Li Ion Polymer battery lasts a long time before recharging is required.

You  a strap or bungee cord to attach to a tree but I often use my BowNear mini camera holder for its ease and versatility of use.

You can place it up high or low at any angle to get some great photos.

 

My Pro-X take awesome photos both far and near in all sorts of weather.

Scouting camera placement is easy when you know where to place your scouting camera.

High-speed trail cameras used now make it lot easier to find that ideal tree to secure your trail camera to.

Most of the higher quality trail camera can be tested and aimed with accurate precision on most well traveled deer trail. You of course need some openings through the bush that won’t hinder your trail camera from being triggered.

Getting out in the forest after that first fresh snow will often pay big dividends when you find crisp tracks cutting across the main trail. I head out after a leisurely breakfast with some comfortable hiking boots and a few layers of clothes to shed as I hike.

Most times I after walking into a forest for ten or twenty minutes I’m far enough away from the road and the deer are more at ease wandering back and forth from bedding area to find feed. Of course if there is a farm near crown land I will walk in that direction if the trail permits.

Snowmobile and ATV trails are great to travel along to dissect a forest in sections and find those deer tracks if they haven’t been used by anyone yet. I find more wolf or coyote tracks traveling down the main trail with deer tracks crossing perpendicular.

My daypack carries one of my SpyPoint Pro X   scouting camera with a set of fresh batteries and a locking cable. Also packed away are my Navionics GPS, plastic gloves and set of clippers.

I will set up my SpyPoint  Pro-X camera about 100 meters deeper in the forest often where it opens up.  As mentioned earlier today’s high-speed cameras will trigger less than two seconds so getting that buck or doe in the frame is easier. Depending on how you set up your camera is also important. Keep it facing north to avoid false detections. I have found if you just want a photo for information on what deer are traveling down that trail set your camera at a lower setting to get as many photos as possible.

Spy-Point-Pro-X

Myself I like a full resolution photo that my SpyPoint Pro X provides (12 MB) as often they may be published in magazines. With a one and half second trigger video or photos are easily captured.  Also the camera’s case small size is easily concealed when attached to a tree.

Do a test walk by, then lock it up and leave. I usually wait for at least three days before returning to check for activity. Wait longer if you don’t plan to hunt that area.

High-speed trail cameras used now make it lot easier to find that ideal tree to secure your trail camera to.  Most of the higher quality trail camera can be tested and aimed with accurate precision on most well traveled deer trail. You of course need some openings through the bush that won’t hinder your trail camera from being triggered.  Getting out in the forest after that first fresh snow will often pay big dividends when you find crisp tracks cutting across the main trail. I head out after a leisurely breakfast with some comfortable hiking boots and a few layers of clothes to shed as I hike.  Most times I after walking into a forest for ten or twenty minutes I’m far enough away from the road and the deer are more at ease wandering back and forth from bedding area to find feed. Of course if there is a farm near crown land I will walk in that direction if the trail permits.  Snowmobile and ATV trails are great to travel along to dissect a forest in sections and find those deer tracks if they haven’t been used by anyone yet. I find more wolf or coyote tracks traveling down the main trail with deer tracks crossing perpendicular.  My daypack carries one of my Spy-Point Pro X   scouting camera with a set of fresh batteries and a locking cable. Also packed away are my Navionics GPS, plastic gloves and set of clippers.  I will set up my Pro-X camera about 100 meters deeper in the forest often where it opens up.  As mentioned earlier today’s high-speed cameras will trigger less than two seconds so getting that buck or doe in the frame is easier. Depending on how you set up your camera is also important. Keep it facing north to avoid false detections. I have found if you just want a photo for information on what deer are traveling down that trail set your camera at a lower setting to get as many photos as possible.   Myself I like a full resolution photo that my Spy-Point Pro X provides (12 MB) as often they may be published in magazines. With a one and half second trigger video or photos are easily captured.  Also the camera’s case small size is easily concealed when attached to a tree. Do a test walk by, then lock it up and leave. I usually wait for at least three days before returning to check for activity. Wait longer if you don’t plan to hunt that area.  Keep it simple, get in and out and you may find that trophy buck you’re hoping to find looking for. At the very least your photos will make you smile.

Keep it simple, get in and out and you may find that trophy buck you’re hoping to find looking for. At the very least your photos will make you smile.

Using a quality scouting trail camera just adds another dimension to your hunt, It’s also a great way to scout 24 hours a day year round.

Doe walking in snow

 

Lessons learned the hard way – keep you expensive camera secured and locked no matter where you use it!

Having lost an expensive SpyPoint Pro-X trail camera is no fun.

When used on public lands I always use a lock box and python cable to secure it to a large tree.

Sadly one camera was stolen on private land where it was locked up.

It was well marked with my name and property of RippleOutdoors

The THIEF has yet to be caught and charged as a tresspaser on private property as well as a common criminal.

SpyPoints new smaller Tiny-W unit will be used

SPYPOINT Tiny-W game camera.  The Tiny-W includes a unique, separate “Black Box” radio receiver that receives backup copies of the images captured by the game camera.  The ultra-compact Tiny-W is only 4.5” x 3.5” x 2.7”, so it’s easy to conceal anywhere.  Choose from video recording mode or multi-shot mode takes up to 6 shots in a row.  Take crystal clear 8.0 megapixel color images and 640 x 480 video by day.  At night, 38 powerful infrared LEDs allow recording of black-and-white images and video.  Seven zone detection sensors are fully adjustable from 5’ to 50’.  Date, Time, temperature and moon phases are stamped on each photo.  Store footage on removable SD/SDHC cards as large as 32GB or output through USB or to a TV.  View all images on the Tiny-W’s 2” viewing screen. Runs on 6 AA batteries or a rechargeable lithium pack(not included).  The Tiny-W includes Black Box receiver, 12V/solar panel power jack, mounting strap, USB cable and video cables.

 

Contact me for additional information on SpyPoint Products or information about my stolen Pro-X trail camera

info{at}rippleoutdoors{dot}com

The big feature about the Tiny and Tiny-W is that these cameras have 0 sec trigger time.  These cameras have 2 extra detector 120 degrees to wake up the camera and the other 5 sensors are to take the photo.  This is why you have no trigger time !   The Tiny-W was developed for all people lost their camera in the field because somebody stole it.  The camera takes photos and records them on the cameras AND on a receiver you can hide anywhere around 50ft.  So if somebody stole your camera, you’ll get photos of him on the receiver!

Prevent camera theft

 

Kip Adams, a Certified Wildlife Biologist and Northern Q.D.M.A. Director

Kip’s Korner is written by Kip Adams, a Certified Wildlife Biologist and Northern Director of Education and Outreach for the Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA)

As a member of QDMA I get some great information written by Kip Adams. Although mostly USA statistics and information a lot of this can be used and applied by Canadian hunters.

The most important tenet of Quality Deer Management (QDM) is to balance the deer herd with the habitat’s ability to support it.  Critics often speak of trophy bucks and antlers as the driving force, but hunters and managers who truly delve into the QDM philosophy quickly learn the correct number of deer for the landscape comes first, followed by balanced sex ratios and complete age structures.  Fortunately, you can work on these three objectives simultaneously by harvesting the biologically appropriate number of antlerless deer and passing young bucks.

Kip Adams QDMA

Many deer herds are more in balance with the habitat today than they’ve been in the recent past, and this is cause for celebration.  However, some areas still have overabundant deer herds resulting from harvesting too few antlerless deer.  Harvesting the proper number of antlerless deer can be difficult for a variety of reasons including hunters’ unwillingness to shoot them; a lack of opportunity with regard to access, seasons and/or bag limits; or simply low hunter numbers or their inability to shoot enough antlerless deer.  Most states currently have more liberal antlerless seasons and bag limits than they’ve had in the past, but some landowners and clubs still have difficulty acquiring enough antlerless tags or permits.

Given that hunter numbers have declined, the average hunter is now asked to take more antlerless animals in overabundant deer situations.  Unfortunately research shows there is a limit to the number of deer an individual hunter is willing to take annually.  This limit is generally less than three deer, and given that one or two may be bucks, the number of antlerless deer is further reduced.  One strategy to increase the impact of the antlerless harvest is to maximize harvest of adult does and minimize harvest of fawns.  I’ll clarify there is nothing wrong with harvesting fawns, and I routinely prescribe a fawn harvest to collect biological data from this age class.  However, if you’re struggling to balance the deer herd with the habitat, and you’re limited in the number of antlerless deer you take during the hunting season, focusing on adult does rather than fawns can help you reach your management objectives more quickly.

The QDMA recommends buck fawns constitute less than 10 percent of your total antlerless harvest.  Educating hunters on distinguishing fawns from adult deer and even separating buck and doe fawns in the field is a relatively simple matter.  By observing head and body features and behavior, most hunters can accurately distinguish between fawns and adults and buck and doe fawns most of the time.  I stress that last part because mistakes will happen.  Specifically, focusing on adult does rather than buck fawns provides more meat for the table, helps balance the herd more quickly, and allows additional buck fawns to survive.  More buck fawns means more yearling bucks the following year, which is good for balancing the adult sex ratio and for hunter satisfaction.

Let’s use a real-world example from where I live in Pennsylvania.  Before the Pennsylvania Game Commission implemented the Deer Management Assistance Program (DMAP) in 2003 most Pennsylvania hunters could only get one or two antlerless tags.  On my family’s farm it was difficult to harvest enough antlerless deer with this restricted bag limit even with an extremely high hunter density of nearly one hunter per 25 acres.  During this time, when someone shot a button buck they had to use their only antlerless tag on it (or one of two), and thus they lost the ability to use it on an adult doe.  We cared far less about removing button bucks than about our lost ability to remove adult does.  Fortunately the Game Commission provides DMAP to most landowners today, and it has allowed us to achieve the proper antlerless harvest for the past several seasons.  Our forester even stated that we are the poster child for oak regeneration in Pennsylvania.  That is a far cry from the denuded oak woods I walked as a child.

Some contend protection of buck fawns is unnecessary, but in situations like the example above I’ll argue that learning to distinguish between antlerless deer in the field and selecting against buck fawns can dramatically help managers meet their deer density goals.  Many state agency biologists recognize this and provide information to hunters on how to identify antlerless deer on the hoof.  With escalating antlerless harvests in many states, we were interested in how the buck fawn harvest has changed over the past decade.  To calculate this, QDMA surveyed all state deer project leaders and asked what percentage of their total antlerless harvest was buck fawns in 1998 and 2008.  The data showed the percentage of buck fawns in the antlerless harvest declined from an average of 19 percent in 1998 to 16 percent in 2008.  This savings may appear small, but given the harvest of approximately 3.4 million antlerless deer in 2008, a 3 percent savings would have equated to 102,000 buck fawns.  Nationally, the percentage ranged from 3 percent in Mississippi (data collected on wildlife management areas and DMAP properties) to 25 percent in Ohio and Wisconsin in 2008.  The percentage in Ohio and Wisconsin is not surprising as both states have highly productive deer herds (i.e., a lot of fawns entering the populations) and aggressive antlerless harvest programs.  However, both states could benefit if some of those buck fawns harvested were adult does instead.  Notable declines in buck fawn harvest from 1998 to 2008 occurred in New Jersey (25 to 13 percent), Georgia (26 to 18 percent), North Carolina (17 to 12 percent) and Virginia (22 to 17 percent).

Many states have progressive deer management programs, and it’s showing in the health and quality of their herds and habitats, and especially in the satisfaction of their hunters.  I’ll reiterate that many deer herds are in balance with the habitat today, and reduced doe harvests are needed in these areas.  The focus of this article was for areas with too many deer and how targeting adult does rather than fawns could increase hunters’ effectiveness at balancing the herd with the habitat.  As fewer hunters are asked to harvest additional deer, more effective and efficient strategies become necessary.  Selecting adult does over buck (and doe) fawns meets this criterion, and it provides additional meat for the table.  Sounds like a win-win situation to me.

Kip’s Korner is written by Kip Adams, a Certified Wildlife Biologist and Northern Director of Education and Outreach for the Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA).  The QDMA is an international nonprofit wildlife conservation organization dedicated to ethical hunting, sound deer management and preservation of the deer-hunting heritage.  The QDMA can be reached at 1-800-209-DEER or www.QDMA.com.