Spring Bear Hunt Returns

Spring Bear Hunt Returns

A generation of hunters will soon experience something they’ve never had the opportunity to do in Ontario.

The Spring Bear Hunt is back.

The Province of Ontario announced the official expansion of the Spring Bear Hunt pilot project on Feb. 19, 2016. The expansion provides hunting opportunities in 88 Wildlife Management Units and includes the participation of non-resident hunters effective May 1.

This return of a lost opportunity serves as a reminder that things that are easily lost are not always easily returned.

The provincial government, amid pressure and propaganda from animal rights activists, originally canceled the Spring Bear Hunt in 1999. A three-year court battle ensued and the OFAH was the only group left defending the rights of black bear hunters across Ontario.

For 17 years the fight continued to have the hunt reinstated and no one worked harder in that timeframe to bring back the Spring Bear Hunt than the OFAH. Years of advocacy on this file resulted in the introduction of a pilot project two years ago and the five-year expansion of the pilot, which was initially announced in the fall of 2015 and finalized last week.

Rod's Masinca with his big black bear

While the expansion of the Spring Bear Hunt pilot project is a huge step in the right direction, the OFAH will always push for sustainable bear management to include a spring hunt.

“We’re pleased that Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry Bill Mauro and the provincial government have recognized the value of a Spring Bear Hunt in Ontario by expanding the pilot project for another five years,” says OFAH Executive Director Angelo Lombardo. “The OFAH remains committed to ensuring that Ontario always has spring bear hunting.”

Baiting regulations announced as part of the expansion will apply to both the spring and fall seasons and will be set by distance. Bait cannot be placed within 500 metres of a residence unless written permission from the owner is obtained, while bait cannot be placed within 500 metres of a public building. Additionally, bait cannot be placed within 200 metres of a right of way for public vehicle traffic or a marked recreational trail.

“We will monitor the impact of those restrictions to ensure that they are having the desired effect without unnecessarily limiting bear hunting opportunities,” says OFAH Senior Wildlife Biologist Mark Ryckman. “We will also do our part to educate and inform hunters on these regulations.”

The Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters is Ontario’s largest, non-profit, fish and wildlife conservation-based organization, representing 100,000 members, subscribers and supporters and 725 member clubs. For more information visit www.ofah.org/springbearhunt and follow us on Facebook (ofah.org/facebook) and Twitter (@ofah).

Archery Gear Not Allowed In Controlled Deer Hunt

Ripple Outdoors Media Release – MNR TIPS LINE

A Chatham man has been fined $1,250 for hunting deer without a licence.

Spencer Baker pleaded guilty and was fined $1,250 for hunting deer without a licence. His hunting licence was suspended for one year.

Court heard that on November 9, 2014, during the controlled deer hunt in the Municipality of Chatham-Kent, a conservation officer inspected an antlered deer that was hanging at a residence. Upon further investigation, it was determined that on November 7, 2014, Baker had killed the deer using his archery equipment.

To participate in the controlled deer hunt, licensed deer hunters must obtain a controlled deer hunt validation tag. During the controlled deer hunt, archery equipment is prohibited.

Justice of the Peace Peter Aharan heard the case in the Ontario Court of Justice, Blenheim, on June 24, 2015.

To report a natural resources violation, call the MNRF TIPS line at 1-877-847-7667 toll-free any time or contact your local ministry office during regular business hours. You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

Ontario Hunting Regulations Ready

2105 Ontario Hunting Regulations In Print

Just saw this Facebook post from Hailee Daniels,,,,worth checking out today

FYI guys, the 2015 Hunting regulations have now been released online. It’ll still be a couple of weeks before stores see copies of them. Remember, stores are only given limited quantities for people to take home, so it’s always a faster and efficient method by looking online if you’re able.

Here is the free downloadable link that will work on most mobile devices, desktops, tablets, etc. that accept PDF format files.

Good luck out there! And remember, it’s OUR responsibility to be up-to-date on this stuff and learn what’s changed. Don’t get caught with your pants down on a regulation that’s changed from a year ago.

       Cut N Past this Link Below or Click on the Book Below                                 2015 Hunting Regulations

https://www.ontario.ca/…/ontario-hunting-regulations-summary

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Submitted Proposals By Moose Hunters In Ontario Ignored

Ontario Moose Hunters Disappointed In MNR Changes

Hunters bear burden of moose management restrictions

Moose hunting in Ontario is undergoing a dramatic change. Despite a clear lack of public support, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) has approved changes to the licensed moose hunting season in Northern Ontario.

“We’re disappointed that no alterations were made to the proposal to reflect the comments received from the public. The Ministry itself admits that the majority of public comments did not support the proposed changes,” said Mark Ryckman, OFAH senior wildlife biologist.

As part of the Moose Project, the MNRF recently proposed two significant changes to moose seasons north of the French and Mattawa Rivers. The first, to take effect in 2015, will prohibit calf harvest outside of a two-week period in October. The second change, beginning in 2016, involves delaying the start of the gun hunt by one week.

While the OFAH acknowledges that the moose resource is the first priority and that some Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) would benefit from a reduction in calf harvest, it argued that delaying the season has no scientific merit, and was not supported by the majority of stakeholders. The OFAH also argued that a two-week calf season is overly restrictive and could result in crowding, poor hunt quality, and less flexibility for hunters.

The season changes come on the heels of drastic tag reductions for the second consecutive year.

“In 2014, adult validation tags were reduced by 18% provincially and the result was 6,000 fewer licensed hunters. In 2015, we are being hit with an additional 15% tag reduction, which will almost certainly result in many people hunting in another jurisdiction, or abandoning moose hunting altogether,” said Ryckman.

WMUs in Northeastern Ontario are suffering the greatest tag reductions, with units 30, 38, and 47 being hit the hardest. Each of those units suffered tag reductions over 80% from last year. The OFAH has received a commitment from the MNRF to proceed with Phase II of the Moose Project, which will involve an examination of all factors that impact moose populations. “It’s time for the Ministry to start managing moose populations, and not just moose hunters. We expect the minister to follow through on his commitment, and turn a promise into action and results,” said Ryckman.

The OFAH will continue to insist on sound moose management that will generate the greatest benefit to the moose resource, while minimizing unnecessary impacts to licensed moose hunters.

moose

Poaching Deer Costs $1000

MNR NEWS – $1,000 Fine and Hunting Ban for Unlawfully Hunting Deer

A Rosseau man has been fined $1,000 for unlawfully hunting white-tailed deer.

Timothy Fraser pleaded guilty and was fined $1,000 for hunting deer without a licence. He is also not allowed to hunt in Ontario for one year.

Court heard that on December 15, 2014, a call to the ministry’s TIPS line reported the shooting of an antlerless deer in the Coate Road area of Muskoka Lakes Township that had occurred on December 14. The tip included licence plate information for a vehicle registered to Fraser.

The investigation revealed that Fraser had been hunting deer in the Coate Road area of Wildlife Management Unit (WMU) 53A, where he shot an antlerless deer with his crossbow. As Fraser had an antlerless deer tag for WMU 49, he did not have a valid licence for the deer he shot. The deer and Fraser’s crossbow were seized. The crossbow will be returned upon payment of the fine.

Justice of the Peace Sue Evans heard the case in the Ontario Court of Justice, Bracebridge, on February 10, 2015.

For further information on hunting regulations, please consult the Ontario Hunting Regulations Summary available at ontario.ca/hunting.

Unlawful Moose Hunt Costs $4600 In Fines

MNR Media Release

Total of $4,600 in Fines for Unlawful Moose Hunt

A Fort Frances man has been fined a total of $4,600 for unlawfully hunting moose.

 John Koles pleaded guilty and was fined $3,500 for hunting moose without a licence and $1,100 for obstructing a  conservation officer. He is not allowed to hunt in Ontario for two years.

 Court heard that on November 1, 2014, a conservation officer responded to a complaint of an abandoned moose near Pearson Road in Farrington Township, east of Fort Frances. When the officer contacted Koles and another individual with a bull moose in the area, Koles said that the other individual killed the moose under the authority of treaty rights. Upon investigation, the officer determined that Koles shot the moose earlier that day without a licence. Koles did not check or field dress the carcass, but immediately left and returned about six hours later with the individual who planned to claim it. The moose had partially spoiled and was seized and forfeited to the Crown. An all-terrain vehicle, trailer and firearm were also seized and will be returned upon payment of fines.

$8000 Fine for Poaching Bull Elk

Three-Year Ban and $8,000 Fine for Poaching Bull Elk

 

A Tweed man has been fined $8,000 and given a three-year hunting suspension for two hunting offences.

Joseph Abrams pleaded guilty to unlawfully hunting a bull American elk when licensed for a cow elk, and abandoning a game animal allowing its flesh to become unsuitable for human consumption.

Court heard that on September 16, 2013, Joseph Abrams was a member of a four-person party licensed to hunt cow elk near Tweed. A bull elk approached Abrams and he shot and killed it. Conservation officers from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry had gone into the hunt camp on September 16, 2013, to enquire if any members heard any shots, which they initially denied. A visit to a second camp reported hearing shots near the suspect camp. When asked, Joseph Abrams indicated that he had not shot any elk. As a result of information received later, conservation officers returned to the area accompanied by a canine detector dog. The dog was able to locate the bull elk that had been intentionally covered with brush.

Justice of the Peace Jack Chiang heard the case in the Ontario Court of Justice, Belleville, Ontario, September 25, 2014.

Two other members of the hunting party previously pleaded guilty to related offences and were fined a total of $4,000 including one-year hunting suspensions.

For further information on hunting regulations, please consult the Ontario Hunting Regulations Summary available at ontario.ca/hunting.

To report a natural resources violation, call the MNRF TIPS line at 1-877-847-7667 toll-free any time or contact your local ministry office during regular business hours. You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

Ohsweken Man Charged For Night Hunting In Ancaster

Fined $1,500 for Illegal Night Hunting Activities

 

An Ohsweken man has been fined $1,500 for night hunting related offences.

 

Eugene Patrick Johns was convicted and fined $1,000 for hunting at night and $500 for possessing a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act.

Court heard that on November 18, 2011, Johns was stopped in the evening by a conservation officer on Paddy Greens Road in the former township of Ancaster, in the City of Hamilton. At the time of the stop, Johns was in possession of an unencased, loaded firearm in his motor vehicle. It was determined that he was unlawfully hunting in the area at night.

The case was heard in the Ontario Court of Justice, Hamilton, on September 2, 2014.

Hunters must safely unload and encase firearms in their possession during the period from a half hour after sunset to a half hour before sunrise. The only exception is for licensed night raccoon hunters. It is illegal to possess a loaded firearm in or on a vehicle or motorboat. The public is reminded that laws regarding the use of firearms are in place for public protection and safety.

For further information on hunting regulations, please consult the Hunting Regulations Summary available at ontario.ca/hunting.

To report a natural resources violation, call the MNR TIPS line at 1-877-847-7667 toll-free any time or contact your local ministry office during regular business hours. You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

Hunters Need to Check Rules on Importing Deer Carcass into Ontario

MNR Media News

A Peterborough man has been fined $3,000 and received a probation order prohibiting him from deer hunting in Ontario for one year for a hunting offence.

 Frank O’Grady pleaded guilty to possessing the whole carcass of a white-tailed deer killed outside Ontario.

Court heard that on January 8, 2014, O’Grady brought the deer carcass from the United States into Ontario via the Fort Erie Peace Bridge, New York. On January 9, 2014, a Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officer attended the O’Grady residence and confirmed that O’Grady was in possession of a whole deer carcass brought into the province from another jurisdiction. It was determined during the investigation that O’Grady was aware that this was against the law. The carcass was subsequently seized.

Justice of the Peace Carl Young heard the case in the Ontario Court of Justice,Peterborough, on June 12, 2014.

Owing to the continuing spread of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) outside Ontario, the possession of high risk carcass parts from all members of the deer family (including deer, elk, moose and caribou) harvested in other jurisdictions is restricted. CWD is a degenerative, fatal brain disease that affects white-tailed deer, elk, mule deer, moose and potentially woodland caribou. There is no evidence that Ontario deer, elk, moose or woodland caribou are infected with CWD. In 2010, new regulations to minimize the risk of CWD entering Ontario came into effect.

Illegal Caviar Tempts Two Richmond Hill Men

MNR NEWS – Taste for Illegal Caviar Leads to $20,750 in Fines

Two Richmond Hill men received a total of $20,750 in fines and probation orders for  illegally possessing lake sturgeon eggs and meat.

Denis Zehovoy and Ilia Kazatchkov pleaded guilty to illegally possessing lake sturgeon eggs and meat. They were each fined $10,000 and are prohibited for the next five years from being within three metres of the Mississagi River in the Town of  Blind River.

Zehovoy also pleaded guilty to making a false statement to a conservation officer and was fined $750.

The court heard that on September 22, 2013, Blind River District conservation officers stopped three anglers in a vehicle as they were travelling back to Toronto. Zehovoy claimed they were transporting only salmon.

Upon inspecting the vehicle, conservation officers located a box containing 27 pounds of sturgeon eggs and four pounds of sturgeon meat.

Further investigation revealed that Zehovoy and Kazatchkov had been fishing in Blind River the previous weekend. They stayed with a Blind River resident and expressed an interest in getting sturgeon eggs, knowing it was illegal to possess them. Zehovoy and Kazatchkov arranged to meet the individual on September 22, at which time they received the eggs and meat.

Justice of the Peace Darlene Hayden heard the case in the Ontario Court of Justice, Blind River, on March 26, 2014.

To report a natural resource violation, call 1-877-TIPS-MNR (847-7667) toll-free any

The lake sturgeon population in the Great Lakes-Upper St. Lawrence River is listed

as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. It is illegal to possess plants or

animals listed as threatened under the act.

To report a natural resource violation, call 1-877-TIPS-MNR (847-7667) toll-free any

time or contact your ministry office during regular business hours.

You can also call  Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).